Disallows unnecessary return await (no-return-await)

Using return await inside an async function keeps the current function in the call stack until the Promise that is being awaited has resolved, at the cost of an extra microtask before resolving the outer Promise. return await can also be used in a try/catch statement to catch errors from another function that returns a Promise.

You can avoid the extra microtask by not awaiting the return value, with the trade off of the function no longer being a part of the stack trace if an error is thrown asynchronously from the Promise being returned. This can make debugging more difficult.

Rule Details

This rule aims to prevent a likely common performance hazard due to a lack of understanding of the semantics of async function.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-return-await: "error"*/

async function foo() {
    return await bar();
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-return-await: "error"*/

async function foo() {
    return bar();
}

async function foo() {
    await bar();
    return;
}

// This is essentially the same as `return await bar();`, but the rule checks only `await` in `return` statements
async function foo() {
    const x = await bar();
    return x;
}

// In this example the `await` is necessary to be able to catch errors thrown from `bar()`
async function foo() {
    try {
        return await bar();
    } catch (error) {}
}

When Not To Use It

There are a few reasons you might want to turn this rule off:

Further Reading

async function on MDN

await vs return vs return await by Jake Archibald

Version

This rule was introduced in ESLint 3.10.0.

Resources